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Allen Peterson: Galleries of work
Northwest Atlanta Globe
cast aluminum, steel bolts, stainless, stained concrete. 8 foot diameter cast aluminum spheroid, roughly 30 x 35 foot plaza, 2015.
This piece was commissioned by Fulton County Arts and Culture for the entry plaza to the Northwest Library at Scotts Crossing.
Photo by Bryan Pearson.
Northwest Atlanta Globe (detail)
I worked with residents of the neighborhoods that are served by the new library – children and adults answered the question "What is important to you about your neighborhood?" in drawings and writings. Some part of each person's response is included in the sculpted metal maps that cover the surfaces of the Globe.
Photo by Bryan Pearson.
Northwest Atlanta Globe (detail)
The industrial look of the sculpture, and its railroad imagery, are a response to the character of the various Northwest Atlanta neighborhoods that this library serves.
detail of Northwest Atlanta Globe
This is a closeup of the 30 foot x 30 foot entry plaza to the Northwest Library at Scotts Crossing. These CNC-plasma cut stainless railroad elements are continuations of the metal tracks that crisscross the maps on the surface of the metal globe. They lead off the sculpture, down its concrete base, and across the entryway plaza before converging on the front door to the library, ushering library users in after they have walked across the surface of the artwork plaza.
Atlanta Map Formed Chronologically
cast iron, 38 x 24 x 3½ inches, 2009.
This map of downtown Atlanta was created in the adjacent industrial neighborhood of Castleberry Hills. As molten iron was poured into a sand mold, the roads appeared as lines of fiery light, in a timelapse view of how the city grew across the land.
Map (Terra Cognita)
iron oxide on cast paper. 47 x 24 x ½ inches, 2004. This large-scale cast paper print was made using the components of the Terrain installation. Paper pulp was pressed into every detail of the hexagonal tiles. The resulting paper took its form, contour, and oxide pigmentation from the surface of the hexagons.
Map (Terra Cognita) detail
iron oxide on cast paper. 93x44x ½ inches. This large-scale cast paper print was made using the components of the Terrain installation. Paper pulp was pressed into every detail of the hexagonal tiles. The resulting paper took its form, contour, and oxide pigmentation from the surface of the hexagons.
Terrain
cast iron. dimensions variable, each hex is 3/8 x4x4 inches. 2003-4
Terrain detail
Each cast iron hexagon is 4 inches across.
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            Communities are central to my work, both in the creative process and in the themes that I investigate.  I enjoy working with communities of people as an integral part of the production of large-scale public art projects.  Even in the more private setting of the studio, my work tends to involve the ideas of systems, structure, cooperation, and interdependence that can describe the formation of a community.

            Themes of maps and bees in my work are metaphors for the interconnections that make up a community.   A map is not a neutral documentation of a location, but forms a portrait of the mapmaker’s priorities through the information about that location that it includes or leaves out.  I use map imagery to play with the ideas of how we try to understand our surroundings and our world.

           

Gallery one: maps
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            Like humans, honeybees form mental maps of their surroundings.  They can communicate the precise location of external resources to other bees within the hive in a language that is based on dance and rhythm.  Bees are a model of community and cooperation that for me suggests the question of how we humans are like bees, and how we are unlike bees. I use materials and processes that relate to the history of industry, such as steel and cast iron, or mold-making and duplicative casting, to relate human effort to the beehive’s iconic industriousness.  Individual elements combine to form structures based on interrelationships.  The systematization of my own production becomes part of the piece as the rules of a game or a system of work. 

          

 
Gallery two: bees
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Crosspollination, 2016
Performance still from the presentation of this work at the grand opening of Sculpture Fields in Chattanooga, TN, April 2016. Photograph by Samuel E Burns.
Crosspollination, 2016
Performance still.
These iron molds were manipulated to produce a succession of hot, glowing, metal bee forms that were "flown" like puppets through the night air by puppeteers in safety gear.
Crosspollination, 2003.
Performance still. These bird-sized iron bee forms were “flown” like puppets by dancers to “pollinate” floral torches with the heat of red-hot metal. The choreography refers to the motion-based language that bees use to direct hive members to external resources.
Hive Consciousness
honeycomb built by bees onto cast beeswax, wood, varnish, latex paint. dimensions variable, 33 x 16½ x 60 inches. 2012
Hive Consciousness detail pp
I sculpted the face and cast it in beeswax; a hive of honeybees then added their contribution by building out their own beeswax honeycomb.
Let’sAllBeBeekeepersWhenWeGrowUp
Cast iron, enamel paint, beeswax, wood, latex paint. Dimensions variable, figures are 6 inches tall. (one hex with figures is 9½ x 13 x 15 inches) 2011-2013.
This piece uses toylike figures to ask for a creative reimagining of agriculture on the scale of the individual.
Beekeepers detail
Cast iron, enamel paint, beeswax, wood, latex paint. Dimensions variable, figures are 6 inches tall. (one hex with figures is 9½ x 13 x 15 inches) 2011-2013.
This piece uses toylike figures to ask for a creative reimagining of agriculture on the scale of the individual.
Let'sAllBeBeekeepersWhenWeGrowUp
Detail, during a Visiting Artist presentation at Turning Sun School.

Cast iron, enamel paint, beeswax, wood, latex paint. Dimensions variable, figures are 6 inches tall. (one hex with figures is 9½ x 13 x 15 inches) 2011-2013.
This piece uses toylike figures to ask for a creative reimagining of agriculture on the scale of the individual.
Urban Bee Platform
Latex paint, wood, paper, fabricated steel. 48x12¾x8 inches. A 1:6 scale concept model of an alternative to the beekeeper’s standard hive. It elevates the hive to a height of 15 to 20 feet above ground, as a feral colony of bees might choose for its habitat in nature, making it possible to establish a hive of bees in a location such as an urban park or nature trail. Elevating the hive allows people to walk close by the site without alarming the bees (or themselves). 2010
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Iron Beehive
Cast iron (bees and hexagons), digitally designed and CNC output steel, 2017. 12.5 x 4 x 4 feet. Currently on display on campus at University of West Georgia.
Iron Beehive detail
Cast iron (bees and hexagons), digitally designed and CNC output steel, 2017. Detail -- bees have 8 inch wingspan. Currently on display on campus at University of West Georgia.
Kirkwood Beehive
mural: latex, acrylic, and spray acrylic on primed masonry wall, 2017. Irregular dimensions, approx. 30 x 50 feet. Corner of Rocky Ford Road and College Ave, Atlanta, Georgia.
Kirkwood Beehive mural detail
mural: latex, acrylic, and spray acrylic on primed masonry wall, 2017. Irregular dimensions, approx. 30 x 50 feet. Corner of Rocky Ford Road and College Ave, Atlanta, Georgia.
Kirkwood Beehive composite photo
mural: latex, acrylic, and spray acrylic on primed masonry wall, 2017. Irregular dimensions, approx. 30 x 50 feet. Corner of Rocky Ford Road and College Ave, Atlanta, Georgia.
Kirkwood Beehive (detail)
latex, acrylic-latex, and spray acrylic on primed masonry wall
Kirkwood Beehive (detail)
latex, acrylic-latex, and spray acrylic on primed masonry wall
Coevolution 1
Coevolution 1, 2011. iron oxide and conté on cast paper. 23x17x¼ inches.
Coevolution 2
Coevolution 2, 2011. iron oxide and conté on cast paper. 23x17x¼ inches.
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            Beyond the bees’ unified work within the hive, for various reasons honeybees have become interdependent with humans.  In 2007, the emergence of Colony Collapse Disorder gave more urgency to the topic of honeybees.  The well-being of honeybees has become a barometer for the environmental health of the planet and the ways in which humans continually impact the global ecosystem.  The relatively abstract ideas of system and community in my work sharpened into more specific questions of interdependence, and the problem of pollinating the crops that humans depend on for food.  I started to raise honeybee hives as a beekeeper, to gain the knowledge of bees provided only by firsthand experience.  I embraced using beekeeping as a sculptural medium, entering the dialogue between the various artists who collaborate with bees.

            The work, whether focused on maps or bees or both as subject matter, is an investigation of the nature of the systems and structure that can make a hive-like synergy possible in our own human communities.  I see my work as a continued questioning of how well we understand ourselves, each other, and our world.  My hope is that the viewer may see the possibilities at play within the structure of the work and accompany me on a journey of inquiry.

 

flora / fauna gallery:

The "flora/fauna" series is inspired by recent collaborations with my friend and local naturalist Charlie Muise.  Conversations with Charlie directed my research into various species of wildlife that live in Georgia.  My love of nature and fascination with natural processes fueled a deepening of my knowledge of local ecosystems and species that make this land their habitat.  That knowledge informed the metalwork that I made for Charlie, and the resulting imagery has continued to steer a course for the work in this series of artwork.

This work was a pop-up exhibition held at Wonderspace Atlanta during November and December 2017.  I designed each of the works in this series digitally, and realized them with a CNC plasma cutter in editions of five. 

Click on any work for pricing info, and click here to contact me about purchases.

click on any image to expand

 
Eastern Meadowlark
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel stain.
13.25 x 12 inches
Edition of 5
3, 4, and 5 are available
$440 as shadowbox (pictured)
Loggerhead Shrike over Longleaf Pine
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel stain.
13.25 x 12 inches
Edition of 5
4 and 5 are available
$440 as shadowbox
Tiger Swallowtail on Milkweed
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel stain.
13.25 x 12 inches
Edition of 5
$440 as shadowbox
Saw-whet Owl
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel stain.
13.25 x 12 inches
Edition of 5
All sold
Green Anole
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel stain.
13.25 x 12 inches
Edition of 5
$440 as shadowbox
Rattlesnake Master
"Eastern Diamondback in Rattlesnake Master"
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel stain.
24 x 12 inches
Edition of 5
3, 4, and 5 are available
$640 as shadowbox (pictured)
Redwings wall
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel paint.
sizes vary from approximately 2 inches to 8 inches
Small size $10 each, 3 for $25
Medium size $18 each, 3 for $45
Large size $25 each, 3 for $65
Redwings detail
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel paint.
sizes vary from approximately 2 inches to 8 inches
Small size $10 each, 3 for $25
Medium size $18 each, 3 for $45
Large size $25 each, 3 for $65
redwings detail 2
Allen Peterson, 2017.
digital design, welded steel, enamel paint.
approx 3 inches each
Small size $10 each, 3 for $25
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Gallery three: public practice

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Paying Your Dues / Fame Stage
Paying Your Dues/ Fame Stage 2014
Two musical performers, bicycle, wood, steel, wheels, sound. A bicycle cart as a tiny stage for musical performance, rolling on the Atlanta BeltLine bicycle trails! It takes two musicians to operate, alternating between pedaling the bike and playing onstage – equal time is the deal. This project was ongoing from August - November 2014.
Plectracycle (at a Hambidge event)
A volunteer performance, playing the Plectracycle while roaming the grounds of the Goat Farm art center in midtown Atlanta during the 2012 benefit for the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts and Sciences.
Diving Board
Site specific installation (concrete park bench), on location of former municipal swimming pool, York, Alabama. 1.5 x2x9 feet. This public work is in Cherokee Park, the main public park in the town of York, Alabama. It marks the site of the former municipal swimming pool, which was unfairly closed by the town’s white officials in 1971 to prevent the facility’s integration.
Kiddie Pool
Cast iron on concrete slab; site-specific installation. 12x 25 feet. This public work is in Cherokee Park, the main public park in the town of York, Alabama. It marks the site of the former municipal swimming pool, which was unfairly closed by the town’s white officials in 1971 to prevent the facility’s integration. Its companion piece, Diving Board, visible to the right, is a functional park bench as well as another site marker.
Northwest Atlanta Globe
Peterson worked with neighbors from the surrounding communities that are served by the library to collect the residents’ answers in drawings and words to the question, “What is most important to you about your neighborhood?” Some part of each response was included on the surface details of the sculpture, so that it was the neighbors themselves who got to choose what would be featured on the map of the area.
Public workshop for "Globe"
Over 150 local neighbors, including these youth at the Bankhead Library, provided their own drawings and words to answer the question, “What is most important to you about your neighborhood?” Some part of each response was included on the surface details of the sculpture, so that it was the residents themselves who got to choose what would be featured on the map of the area.
Detail of Northwest Atlanta Globe
Allen Peterson worked some part of each person's response into the surface details of the sculpture, so that it was the residents themselves who got to choose what would be featured on the map of the area. Visible here on the finished aluminum sculpture are an apartment complex, two elementary schools, and a fish pond, all as drawn by local neighbors.
Public workshop for "Globe"
Over 150 local neighbors, including these youth at the Perry Homes Library, provided their own drawings and words to answer the question, “What is most important to you about your neighborhood?” Some part of each response was included on the surface details of the sculpture, so that it was the residents themselves who got to choose what would be featured on the map of the area. Lisa Tuttle of Fulton County Public Art is working with them here.
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Redwings detail

Allen Peterson, 2017. digital design, welded steel, enamel paint. sizes vary from approximately 2 inches to 8 inches Small size $10 each, 3 for $25 Medium size $18 each, 3 for $45 Large size $25 each, 3 for $65